Understanding the accommodating intraocular lens

The following is an overview of premium IOLs currently that are FDA-approved for use by cataract surgeons in the United States.

These are considered "premium" intraocular lenses because they have advanced features beyond those found in basic single vision IOLs that are covered by Medicare and other types of health insurance.

Your cataract surgeon can help you decide if you are a good candidate for multifocal IOLs at your preoperative exam and consultation.

Laser cataract surgery often is recommended if you are interested in multifocal IOLs, because precise alignment of these lenses is very important to give you the best visual outcome at all distances.

Accommodating IOLs are premium intraocular lenses that expand the range of clear vision with both an aspheric design and flexible "haptics" — the supporting legs that hold the IOL in place inside the eye.

In this scenario, the fully corrected eye sees distant objects clearly (but cannot see very well up close without glasses), and the mildly nearsighted eye sees very well up close without glasses (but not so clearly far away).

Popular FDA-approved multifocal IOLs include: Tecnis Multifocal IOL (Abbott Medical Optics) and Acry Sof IQ Re STOR (Alcon).

An alternative to accommodating and multifocal IOLs for correcting presbyopia is monovision.

During your preoperative exam and consultation, your cataract surgeon can help you choose the best IOL for your needs, as well as additional cataract surgery costs involved if you choose one of the following premium lens implants.

Traditional intraocular lenses have a spherical optical design, meaning the front surface is uniformly curved from the center of the lens to its periphery.

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Conventional spherical IOLs are monofocal lenses, meaning they are designed to provide clear vision at a single focal point (usually far away for good driving vision, for example).

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